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St Mary’s Church, San Francisco

Minimalism is not that you should own nothing. But that nothing should own you.

The overall keynote of Eights is expansiveness. The psyche of the Eight is “volcanic,” as if a massive force were constantly moving outward to impact or dominate the environment. The primary force is aggression that is directed toward the external world by the Eight’s formidably strong ego.

Paradox & Creative

September 2, 2014 — Leave a comment

“I have devoted 30 years of research to how creative people live and work, to make more understandable the mysterious process by which they come up with new ideas and new things. If I had to express in one word what makes their personalities different from others, it’s complexity. They show tendencies of thought and action that in most people are segregated. They contain contradictory extremes; instead of being an individual, each of them is a multitude.”

Mihaly

Actor–observer asymmetry (also actor–observer bias) explains the errors that one makes when forming attributions about the behavior of others (Jones & Nisbett, 1971). When people judge their own behavior, and they are the actor, they are more likely to attribute their actions to the particular situation than to a generalization about their personality. Yet when an observer is explaining the behavior of another person (the actor), they are more likely to attribute this behavior to the actors’s overall disposition rather than to situational factors. This frequent error shows the bias that people hold in their evaluations of behavior (Miller & Norman, 1975). Because people are better acquainted with the situational (external) factors affecting their own decisions, they are more likely to see their own behavior as affected by the social situation they are in. However, because the situational effects of anothers’ behavior are less accessible to the observer, observers see the actor’s behavior as influenced more by the actor’s overall personality. The actor-observer asymmetry is a component of the ultimate attribution error.

This term falls under “attribution” or “attribution theory”. The specific hypothesis of an actor-observer asymmetry in attribution (explanations of behavior) was originally proposed by Jones and Nisbett (1971), when they claimed that “actors tend to attribute the causes of their behavior to stimuli inherent in the situation, while observers tend to attribute behavior to stable dispositions of the actor” (p. 93). Supported by initial evidence, the hypothesis was long held as firmly established, describing a robust and pervasive phenomenon of social cognition.

The art of living … is neither careless drifting on the one hand nor fearful clinging to the past on the other. It consists in being sensitive to each moment, in regarding it as utterly new and unique, in having the mind open and wholly receptive.

Unknown

Ephemeral

August 27, 2014 — Leave a comment

- Lasting for a short period of time.
- (biology) Existing for only one day, as with some flowers, insects, and diseases
- (geology, of a body of water) Usually dry, but filling with water for brief periods during and after precipitation.

Virtually all acts of greatness are the work of an ensemble.

Keith Yamashita

Myth of Reality

August 27, 2014 — Leave a comment

But the myth is in fact a myth. “Reality” is not fixed—it’s a phenomenon that arises in language. The world does not speak, only we do. Each moment’s meaning “occurs” against a background of understanding, and how the world “occurs” to us lives in language—it’s there that access to restoring our power lies. From there, we can reveal and dismantle old assumptions about the way things have been or the way we thought they had to be. Reality is declarative, interpretive, and actionable—we have dominion in the world of saying. Recognizing that shifts our relationship to the world. It doesn’t just lead to a different view, it gives us hands-on access to a world that’s malleable and open to being invented. It’s where transformation lives.

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The Princess of the house, little kittens rule.

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My little BooBoo